Who can become a COACH with big ‘C’?

Howdy,

Hmmm, I think that people simply don’t understand that coaching is one of the “hardest jobs” on the planet (it must be because, among other things, you work with alive people – not machines). This is the reason I am often pissed off when some dude wants to become a coach just after finishing sports career – when he/she thinks that more than average playing experience is all they need.

A lot of former athletes who had a long career will probably do that while find something better paid. I have the only one sentence for all of them – if you strive to become a coach because of money, you are a BUSINESSMAN (not a COACH) and can’t help people. They think that it’s enough if they are familiar with some sports branch more than average, they think that being a coach is something anyone can do just with enough playing experience. Maybe the even bigger fault is reserved for hiring managers or whoever is responsible for hiring a new coaches in some sports club (how someone uneducated can even chose a coach?!).

“When you talk to potential trainers, does it seem like something where they’re in it for the long run? Do they attend continuing education courses? Did they get their degree in exercise science or kinesiology? Do they have an intake process? Did they do an assessment before giving you a program? If they’re in it just because they like working out while they’re trying to get a “real” job, this is someone I would question working with.” Brendon Rearick

They can do it – but probably not on quality way. Why working something with no quality? You should strive to become “best possible coach”. That requests a lot of professional dedication in science and practice both. If they start to work with kids things can be even worse because it’s a very specific group (although you need the same level of expertize when working at any level – whether with kids or pro athletes). Youth need a proper sports/life education, how someone uneducated can do this highly responsible job? Only the best professionals should work with kids – because a coach should be highly educated for fullfiling their specific needs (coaches can’t gain that knowledge by playing only). Furthermore, a lot of former high level athletes don’t have (and won’t to get) a necessary patience for kids.

Coaches who are constantly trying to be an innovative (following and producing a suspicious new training devices, means and methods) becoming businessmen also and particularly “crying for money” only. They are trying to attract clients with new attractions constantly. Be sure that they, besides their “crying for money”, don’t understand very well the human body. The basis will always remain the basis and the best exercising is the SIMPLEST exercising!

Some coaches have become successful without a proper education (I mean on good sports school), it’s true – but if you closely look on their professional life you can notice a tremendous “24h-7days-deddication” and will for constantly gaining a new knowledge (education is not just a school). Only on that way, after 20 years of practice approx., you can stand in front of the mirror and say: “I became a COACH”. I spoke with a lot of successful trainers and all of them agree with that fact.

One thing is certain, they probably don’t have enough education for that type of job. It’s a rare situation where some of them had a brilliant coach/es long time during career (coach/es who had such a perfect influence in any sense) and learned everything important. Yeah, you can do that if you have a luck to be with a perfect coach “who will do everything you fall in love in training” but most of former athletes are guided by poor trainers (and poor educational process through it) during longer part of their sports career and they didn’t have a chance to learn a ton of valuable information. The problem starts when you carry over the same philosophy (in role of trainer) to your athletes in future (this often happens). You need your own good philosophy if you want to become a good coach.

The only one “good” thing a poor trainer can teach players is how to fight 🙂 … I don’t mean on “life’s fight” (struggle) – which is worth to learn.

By the way, if you haven’t finished serious faculty/university (any faculty where you need a PATIENCE and hard work to get it done… – lack of patience in long term learning process is maybe the biggest problem in industry today) that’s probably mean you are lazy, too money oriented, do not have a patience and(or) do not have a clear goal. Those items/traits are very important and if you possess JUST ONE of them, SMART employers could refuse you for a job very easy. And, of course, it means also that kinesiology probably isn’t your biggest passion… Of course that some people can possess a huge knowledge without faculty (they are rare), but only if they chose right books, trainers and multiyear hard work/passion for sure. Don’t get me wrong, I am talking about patience mostly here, universities provides a minimum base when it comes to knowledge (but without that base it’s really difficult to stay on the right path and good universities can give you that base). So, if you want an education – go to school, but if you want the best knowledge – you must do it by yourself!

Ok, I will briefly mention now a former pro athletes who want to become coaches IMMEDIATELLY after finishing playing career. You can see them almost exclusively working at pro level because it’s difficult to separate from the glory – strong instinct for the glory maintaining (this should remain the practice because they don’t have a knowledge, patience and understanding for other levels very often). They have a huge playing experience (which could help for sure), but not like a coach (coaching experience). They don’t know “everything” about chosen sport for sure (average people think they do know and are truly experts because they played at pro level and that sounds GOOD – they BELEIVE them), they need a lot of education (they are often convinced that know everything and don’t need additional education – which is even worse). They could maybe lead a pro team – and be very successful without enough coaching experience because they work with PROS (working with pros isn’t so difficult especially if you already have a decent tactics knowledge and authority which is normal for almost any former elite athlete, and also especially when surrounded with a good multidisciplinary staff like a coach). There is a big desire for self-assertion among young pro players especially, and a coach who was a former sports star has a great advantage on the psychological level (it’s not hard to lead any team under such conditions). There is almost only a big pressure, but former pro level athletes know how to deal with pressure/stress! The real coaching stars are not former sports stars but they CAN become that with A LOT of effort and time (because a huge playing experience can be used to help a lot in achieving that goal).

Authority is perhaps the most important thing you need for a coaching job. You can get it with strictness or with knowledge (when athletes see that you were right after some situation). The best option is if you possess both – a discipline and dedication both are the best in that case (unfortunately we don’t live in an ideal world where every young athlete will “respect” you if you are knowledgable but “soft” type of coach). Or you can gain that with showing that you can do something better than your athletes – but that can be among young male population (athletes) mostly (you can become even an idol among them 🙂 ).

I have mentioned a business word earlier (oh, such an ugly word). Listen, everyone know that you can’t live without money in today’s world settings but you have to possess strong intrinsic motivation if you want to become a COACH. If you possess an extrinsic motivation (money is the first work motive) you will actually start losing money because your clients will notice that really soon. Be aware that you can’t do something really boring to you (job you don’t like too much) for long time without getting crazy 🙂 . In short, you need to LOVE your profession and people included in that – money will come easier than you think.

Does it make sense?

“When you do what you love, you heal this world. Because when you do what you love, you shine. You become happy. The World is crying for more happiness.” Perry Nickelston

Why I don’t like people who think that coaching is easy and not so serious job (a loooot of people think that) is due to the fact they are not aware that they could KILL someone with exercise (do not afraid, it’s not often but killing slowly is everyday unconscious process). They can seriously hurt someone at best, or make the micro traumas for future injury. Maybe I understand them because they don’t have a proper education about coaching profession (they are simply not aware). Maybe they would run away from it if they knew how complex and responsible it is. Maybe not, in vain – someone will never become aware and responsible…

You need to have a lot of science and practice knowledge if you want to become a coach with big letters – COACH! For more info read my first blog post ever HERE 🙂 .

In short, everything you need is a high dedication and responsibility with magnifying insight 😉 .

Thanks for reading and all the best,

Luka

 

 

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